Wie können Laien wissenschaftliche Expertise beurteilen?

image_pdfimage_print

Immer mehr Journalisten nehmen der Wissenschaft gegenüber eine kritische Position ein, berichtet der Columbia Journalism Review. Zitiert werden Beispiele, in denen Journalisten gegen Forschungsergebnisse zum Beispiel in Physik und Astronomie im Detail argumentativ Stellung beziehen. Dahinter, so die Vermutung, stecke ein Wandel im Selbstverständnis des Wissenschaftsjournalismus.

Aber wie können können Journalisten wissenschaftliche Expertise beurteilen, wenn sie selbst nicht vom Fach sind? Janet D. Stemwedel verrät im Scientific American die Antwort. Zwei Tipps hält sie bereit:

(1)

One way to judge scientific credibility (or lack thereof) is to scope out the logical structure of the arguments a scientist is putting up for consideration. It is possible to judge whether arguments have the right kind of relationship to the empirical data without wallowing in that data oneself. [DDET weiter…]Credible scientists can lay out:

  • Here’s my hypothesis.
  • Here’s what you’d expect to observe if the hypothesis is true. Here, on the other hand, is what you’d expect to observe if the hypothesis is false.
  • Here’s what we actually observed (and here are the steps we took to control the other variables).
  • Here’s what we can say (and with what degree of certainty) about the hypothesis in the light of these results.
  • Here’s the next study we’d like to do to be even more sure. [/DDET]

(2)

Examining a scientific paper to see if the sources cited make the claims that they are purported to make by the paper citing them is one way to assess credibility.